1. Spencer Torkelson – 1B
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 220 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Arizona State
The top bat in the draft, Torkelson has the definition of light tower power. Torkelson doesn’t have the size or swing you expect for someone with his raw power profile. He isn’t built like Jim ThomeAndrew Vaughn. That said, he makes plenty of contact with great natural loft and finish to his bat path. He gets to his power in games to all fields and seemingly puts the ball out to left-center with true ease. His short stride allows him to stay back on pitches exceptionally well. When combined with a great natural eye and willingness to draw walks give us great confidence in his ability to hit for both power and get on base at a very high clip.

Torkelson is a below average runner, but a better athlete than you’d expect. He has looked very good defensively in our looks, even making a leaping play where he pirouetted in mid air towards the first baseline while falling backwards, twisting his body against his momentum against UW in 2019. He looked like a boundary WR on that play and it certainly opened up our eyes to what he can be defensively. He is a tick above defensively at first, with some potential to play left field if needed and an average arm. You won’t be drafting him for his glove but there’s a big gap between what he can do defensively and an Aaron Sabato (#50 on this list).

Our own Ralph Lifshitz says Torkelson is the most confident he’s personally been in a hitter since he started scouting. His combination of easy power, plate discipline and work ethic give him an incredibly high chance of success at the next level and there is a chance he can unlock even more contact ability as he goes through major league coaching.
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2. Asa Lacy – LHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 215 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Texas A&M
Always seen as a lock of a first rounder this year, Texas A&M lefty Asa Lacy broke out with a huge spring to push himself into the mix for a top 5 draft pick thanks to a huge improvement in his slider. The 6’4″, 215 lefty has a four-pitch mix that includes three pitches you can put a plus grade on. The mid to upper 90s fastball is his main pitch, and one hitters struggle to square up, but his hard slider is also a plus pitch and his change could be his third plus pitch with more work. The fourth pitch is his curve, a solidly average to slightly above average pitch. Lacy’s command is a work in progress, and he walked 4.4 batters per nine last year. It did seem improved this spring, but then again we are working off a four-start sample size so it isn’t really something that can be judged. Lacy has top of the rotation upside and is also a safe bet to at least be a middle of the rotation starter depending on how the command improvement goes.
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3. Austin Martin – OF/3B
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 185 lbs, Height: 6-0
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Vanderbilt
The Vanderbilt product is undoubtedly one of the top draft prospects in this class and has been for a long time. He’s got an entire bag of tools that could help transform a lineup, starting with his plus hit tool to lead the pack. The power isn’t to the level of the hit tool, but his bat to ball skills should help it play up a little more. In the shortened college season, Martin slashed .377/.507/.660, driving in 11 runs.

Defensively, he’s been talked about all over the diamond. Many believe he could land at shortstop, he’s played third base in college, he may even be a center fielder when all is said and done. He’s shown the arm and speed to be able to handle any of these positions. He shouldn’t have to wait too long to hear his name, and he figures to be a guy who could ascend quickly through an organization.
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4. Emerson Hancock – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 213 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Georgia
Widely viewed as the top pitcher in the class before the 2020 college season, and possibly a candidate for the first overall pick, Emerson Hancock saw his stock take a slight hit in the very short season. This has to do both with his shaky starts against Richmond and Georgia Tech, where he looked much more hittable than usual, and Asa Lacy’s incredible performance in his four starts against better competition. Depending on how much weight you put in those for starts for both pitchers, the top arm in this class remains up for debate, but Hancock has a great argument.

With four pitches that have all flashed plus at times, Hancock is almost certainly the most polished pitcher in this class. His arsenal is headlined by a fastball which touches 99 mph and has decent life to it. To complement his fastball, Hancock arguably has two plus pitches at their best with his changeup and slider, with a power curveball that he also sprinkles in every once in a while. Hancock has excellent command, and pounds the zone with all four of these pitches, while also possessing very sound mechanics and a projectable 6-foot-4 frame. While his stock has taken a bit of a hit in 2020, it’s unlikely that Hancock makes it past the Blue Jays at number 5, and he has the potential to be a fast riser in whatever system he ends up in.
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5. Zac Veen – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 190 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Spruce Creek (FL)
Veen jumped into the scouting spotlight as a PG events stand out in 2018, but really jumped into the national spotlight when he homered off of Matt Allan in his high school playoffs. It’s been a steady rise for Veen, who stood out all summer despite not attending the full slate of events and is now the consensus top prep player in the class.

Veen has a highly projectable 6-foot-4 frame with a smooth swing from the left side with a slight leg raise and easy bat speed. He gets natural loft from his 6-foot-4 frame and uses an all fields approach with clearly evident ball to barrel skills. Given his frame projection, he should grow into more power, potentially grading as a true plus tool in the future. As such, people have been quick to compare him to an exciting list of players that include Cody BellingerShawn GreenChristian YelichKyle Tucker. What excites us most about Veen is how advanced his eye is at the plate for a player his age with his natural tools. Veen is very patient with a good feel for the zone and knows how to lay off of spin.

While his swing has some aspects that could cause timing issues down the line, Veen’s been consistently battle-tested in Florida, and has proven that his very mature approach holds up against some of the top arms in this year’s (and last year’s) class in games. From an offensive perspective, players with Veen’s combination of physical projection, bat to barrel skills, all-fields approach and plate discipline are rarely seen in the prep ranks.

He plays centerfield and will likely start his career there, but is likely a better long term fit in right. Veen is currently an average runner and could potentially slow down as he fills out his frame. But he’s athletic and takes good routes for his age in the outfield and has a strong and notably accurate arm, consistently one-hopping balls on a line to third or home in drills. He should be an average or better defender in right at maturity.

Overall, Veen is one of the higher upside players in the class. He has potential to develop into a plus hit, plus power corner outfielder who still adds value defensively. Additionally, a team that signs him will be able to mold him themselves, making him particularly attractive to teams with strong beliefs in their dev systems. The raw tools are there for a very exciting young player.
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6. Nick Gonzales – SS/2B
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 190 lbs, Height: 5-10
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: New Mexico State
One of the most talented bats in this draft, the always hitting Nick Gonzales is a top prospect in 2020. After going on one of the craziest runs in college baseball of the past three years, Gonzales has shown the bat isn’t just boosted by Amateur Coors (Presley Askew Field) as shown in an outstanding summer on the Cape.

Gonzales has excellent bat control and finds the barrel easy with raw power that shines. Although some questions remain for his legitimacy to be more than just a line drive hitter at the professional level. Gonzales has a very good sense of the strike zone, with a 45/30 BB/K last year.

Although he has improved in that area and New Mexico State played him in short stop this year, Gonzales still gives up some defensive errors here and there. The arm isn’t quite strong enough to play elsewhere than second base but the bat more than makes up for it. Some questions still show up about Gonzales’ physical ceiling as he is pretty well built already at 5’10” 190, adding on to the question of if Gonzales is better suited as a gap-to-gap hitter at the next level. Regardless, Gonzales is a very talented player and can become a very useful player at the professional level.
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7. Max Meyer – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 185 lbs, Height: 6-0
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Minnesota
Small righty with big stuff, Meyer started his college career in the bullpen and transitioned to the rotation mid-2019 before settling in as the Friday night starter for the Gophers in 2020. Meyer displays premium athleticism and shows it off with a near effortless delivery. Meyer sits 97-99 with the heater but it dips into the mid-90s as the game progresses. The pitch has some natural cut to it as well. His slider might be the best secondary pitch in the draft and it gets plus grades due to the depth and velocity (91-93) of the pitch. He made tremendous strides with the changeup in 2020, but it could become an average pitch with some tweaks and proper sequencing.

There are some concerns about Meyer’s ability to hold up as a starter due to his frame and lack of a track record as a starter. We’re not worried about the lack of a track record as he finished 2019 very strong and was dominant for Team USA before showcasing himself in 2020. The frame isn’t an issue due to the athleticism. Meyer is the type of arm that will carve out an important role on a modern pitching staff as a starter or late-game reliever. The development of the changeup will decide his fate.
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8. Garrett Mitchell – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 204 lbs, Height: 6-3
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: UCLA
From a pure talent and tools standpoint, Mitchell belongs right up there with anyone in this class. His ability to just flat out hit has vastly improved over the last two seasons, enough so that Mitchell showed an above-average to plus hit tool in his offensive arsenal. The big appeal with him this season would’ve been, before the cancellation, seeing him tap into the raw power he possesses in a strong 6-foot-3, 205-pound frame. Had we gotten a full season out of Mitchell it’s likely that he would’ve been a consensus top five talent in this class, but we just haven’t seen that come to fruition quite yet. Regardless, Mitchell is an uber athlete with a true 70-grade run tool that’ll stick in centerfield moving forward and should hit enough. The final product could be an impressive all-around player that impacts the game in multiple facets.
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9. Mick Abel – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 190 lbs, Height: 6-5
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Jesuit (OR)
In a class heavy with excellent college arms, Abel presents the opportunity to select a prep arm with polish, depth in offerings, and the ability to likely move almost as quickly as some of the collegiate arms in this class.

Abel is long-armed and long-legged in his 6-foot-5 frame, but he is able to repeat his delivery very well. He’s lean, but his build is such that he might not fill out too much beyond 200 pounds onto his frame.

The offerings include three potential 55+ pitches with a fastball that sits 90-94 and has touched 96-97 with impressive late life, a short-break slider that works mid-80s, and a change that tends to sit just a tick below the slider. He tunnels the change and slider together well from video view, but they break opposite directions, which is death on hitters attempting to hit him.
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10. Austin Hendrick – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 195 lbs, Height: 6-0
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: West Allegheny (PA)
One of the most talented hitters in a draft class brimming with left handed hitting prep outfielders with first round evaluations. A thunderous bat is Hendrick’s defining characteristic, his elite bat speed and raw power set him apart from his peers and he should likely land somewhere in the early to mid first round.

A cold weather prep prospect hailing from Pennsylvania, Hendrick is still somewhat raw as far as his hit tool is concerned. His approach needs work and he can get off time. Recent adjustments, noted in our player profile breakdown with Brian Sakowski of Perfect Game, having quieted some of those timing issues. Unlikely to handle centerfield long term, but should have the arm and outfield instincts to be average or better at a corner.
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11. Jared Kelley – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 215 lbs, Height: 6-3
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Refugio (TX)
A hard throwing prep righty from Texas, Kelley really separated himself from most of the class this summer, while closing the gap on Mick Abel. Kelley generates easy velocity, sitting 95-96 while touching 99 with his fastball without notable effort or head-whack. Kelley generates some armside run with the heat and has shown the ability to consistently locate the pitch. His best complement to the heat is a changeup that flashes plus. It has fantastic sink, thrown with very similar arm speed to his heat and can generate up to 15 mph of velocity gap from the heat. Kelley spots the pitch well and it plays up further due to hitters needing to be prepared for his exceptional fastball velocity. Kelley also throws a slurvy breaking ball in the low 80s that will flash average but lacks clear definition and lags behind the breakers of other first round prep arms.

While Kelley has a loose and fairly clean arm action for a young flamethrower, the arm action is longer than you’d like to see in the back and he can get a bit out of whack with his hips at times. It’s not a perfect delivery, but there’s enough there in the frame and delivery to believe he can handle a starter’s workload (though he would be fun to watch out of the pen).

Kelley has shown the ability to locate you’d expect from an FB/CH pitcher, consistently hitting the zone and locating well within the zone itself. The breaker is still a work in progress, but reports from those who saw him this spring were that it began to flash above average and had improved. Kelley has also flashed an advanced ability to sequence his pitches and seems to be a true student of the position.

There are some lingering concerns with Kelley, from the length of his arm action, to the development of his curve, to the track record of flame throwing prep righties. But overall, Kelley offers rare velocity upside, with a true out pitch change, advanced sequencing and a solid frame with easy arm speed. When you factor in his ability to hit the zone, he is a bit reminiscent of a young Chris Paddack and has high-end SP2 upside if it all comes together. He’s likely the most MLB ready prep pitcher and even in a loaded class shouldn’t be allowed to make it past the top half of the first round.
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12. Robert Hassell – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 195 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Independence (TN)
Hassell really pushed his way towards the top of the list of prep outfielders with an impressive showing at the plate in last summer’s MLB PDP League. The Tennessee prep product proved he may have the best hit tool in this entire prep class, with power that can be above average. There isn’t a lot of debate about his bat, though some do question if the power is only more average than above.

Where the debate comes in is the rest of his tool set. Some believe he is an above average athlete, while others aren’t sure the 6’2, 195 pounder is going to be better than just an average athlete limited to a corner outfield spot. Either way the defense is an average tool, but that athleticism projection will be key to determining if he can handle centerfield or gets stuck in a corner outfield spot — which would likely be right field as he has the arm to handle it. His Vanderbilt commit gives some pause, but he is expected to get drafted high enough that it shouldn’t be an issue.
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13. Reid Detmers – LHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 210 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Louisville
In a draft that boasts some high upside arms, Detmers is seen as one of the better floor pitchers in the draft. The Louisville lefty is a pitchability guy. He throws strikes and can command his stuff. That is what helped him to post impressive K/BB numbers in the college season before it abruptly ended.

One of the biggest drawbacks of Detmers is his lack of premium velocity. The good news is that he has a clearly plus offering with his curveball, which is far and away his best pitch. He’ll also show a nice changeup.

Detmers is pretty universally thought to have a good floor and if it all clicks will provide a team with a strike-throwing, middle of the rotation arm.
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14. Ed Howard – SS
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 185 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Mount Carmel (IL)
In case you haven’t heard it a million times, Ed Howard was the shortstop for the Jackie Robinson West Little League Team that made it to the final of the 2014 Little League World Series. Apparently every single report on Howard has to start with that fact, so we figured we’d get that out of the way. Five years later, Howard is the top prep shortstop in this class by a decent margin, and for good reason too. He stands out mainly because he has little to no holes in his game, which is especially impressive given his age.

Defensively, Howard has all the tools to be a plus defender, and there are almost no doubts that he’ll be able to stay at shortstop. He’s got a great arm, fluid motions, and the baseball IQ to be able to make all of the plays he needs to. On the offensive side of the ball, Howard isn’t quite as polished, but he still has a ton to offer. Howard displays great bat speed on top of solid bat to ball skills, that when combined with a projectable 6-foot-2 frame lead to a package that has a decent bit of upside.

The one knock on Howard’s game would be that he hasn’t displayed much power in game yet, and it remains to see if his power will develop. Even if the power never reaches above-average level, Howard offers an arsenal of tools that has the potential to be very valuable. Since he hasn’t played at all in 2020, his stock is very difficult to gauge, but if he falls to the late first round, Ed Howard could be a steal.
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15. Garrett Crochet – LHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 218 lbs, Height: 6-6
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Tennessee
One of the highest rising names over the past three years, Garrett Crochet has grown into a big time name in the 2020 draft class. Crochet, like many, had a very short spring. Throwing only three innings all year having been held back from shoulder soreness prior to a start against Wright State the final weekend before the shut down. However, thanks to a summer appearance with the USA Collegiate National Team and a breakout 2019 and strong fall camp, Crochet remained a strong name headed into this spring.

Crochet is an athletic 6-foot-6 lefty with room to grow. His go-to is his combination of his fastball and slider. The fastball is dominant around 93-98, usually breaking to his gloveside. When he can have good command of the pitch, it can push in and jam right handed hitters, something Crochet worked on over the summer. He is at his best when the fastball is spotting well, can easily throw it over bats on the inside of lefties or spot the bottom third of the zone. However, Crochet can be subject to giving up hits to great bat speed or a good slap hitter. He likes to tunnel his fastball with a great slider as his out pitch. The slider is used to attack the backfoot against righties and slices away well against lefties at 84-86. However, one reason why Crochet is up so high in our rankings is his improved changeup, another thing Crochet focused on the most during the offseason. In his very short three innings in the spring, the pitch ran armside after selling a sweeping movement at 89-90 mph. The pitch is a major step up to have Crochet becoming more than a two-pitch wonder at the professional level. Crochet extends off the mound very well to produce a sweeping 3/4 arm slot with high velocity, making him a very promising name this draft.
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16. Patrick Bailey – C
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 192 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: S/R
School: North Carolina State
The top catcher in the class, Bailey’s a polished switch-hitter who terrorized ACC pitching his entire time at NC State. He’s got fantastic pitch recognition skills (evidenced by the 53/47 BB/K in his college career) from both sides of the plate. He certainly looks more comfortable as a left-handed hitter, where he generates above-average bat speed. This spring, he seemed to get a bit more upright in his set-up and more quickly loaded his hands away from his body, unlocking some dormant raw power. He hit six home runs, surpassing his five from the prior season in just over half the plate appearances. Bailey’s right-handed swing is less explosive, but he has advanced bat-to-ball skills from both sides. A solid receiver with an average arm, he’s not a game-changer defensively, but he shouldn’t have any problem sticking behind the plate.
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17. Cade Cavalli – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 226 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Oklahoma
At six-foot-four, 225 pounds, Cavalli has the ideal size, arm slot and overall mechanics that organizations covet. The University of Oklahoma product hit 98 with the fastball in game this season but mostly sits in the 93-95 range, and he works the pitch in the upper part of the zone which fits well in today’s game. His best pitch is his slider, which he manipulates depending on the hitter but serves as his primary out-pitch. There’s a future average changeup here and he also throws a 12-to-6 curveball that fits with how he attacks up in the zone with the fastball and his arm slot. He’s battled some injuries in his career (back and a stress reaction in his right arm) but they appear to be behind him at the moment. There’s a strong chance Cavalli goes off the board in the top 15 picks.
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18. Heston Kjerstad – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 205 lbs, Height: 6-3
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Arkansas
Kjerstad started the 2020 season off with a bang, terrorizing any pitcher he faced and solidifying himself as one of the top college baseball performers in the country. This electric opening performance stuck with evaluators, so much so that he skyrocketed up most draft boards. Kjerstad’s setup and overall motion at the plate is unconventional but he does an adequate job of getting in sync to drive the baseball. It’s an easy 60-grade power tool for the 21-year-old outfielder.

The big question mark with Kjerstad is how well he’s going to actually make contact at the next level. His swing has worked thus far into his amateur career but it does get a little long at times and there have been some swing-and-miss issues already. Professional pitchers are going to take advantage of that more often than not, which is why Kjerstad is ranked where he is on this list. An improvement in the hit tool could, albeit still dealing with some strikeout issues, untap an absolute monster that could mash 30+ home runs on an annual basis and be an impact major league power bat.
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19. Pete Crow-Armstrong – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 180 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Harvard-Westlake (CA)
Known by many simply as “PCA”, Crow-Armstrong is perhaps boring in that he’s a guy with high-level center field defense with excellent contact skills and speed. One could quickly see a comparison to predraft evaluations on Mickey Moniak before Moniak was a first overall selection.

However, PCA is more than just a ho-hum selection that will methodically work his way to the majors and be a regular, not a star. While that would be very good, PCA was considered by many as the top prospect in the class entering last summer before a rough showcase season, and he’s flashed average to above-average power previously. Combine that with a potentially elite defensive profile, and PCA could bring plenty of value to the table with a wide variety of skills.
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20. Cole Wilcox – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 232 lbs, Height: 6-5
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Georgia
A potential first rounder as a prep prospect way back in 2018, Wilcox is back on the heels of a strong start to his sophomore season. Wilcox has long been a power thrower, with triple-digit fastball readings to back it. His transition to pitcher culminated in his four start 2020 where he allowed just two walks across 23 innings while striking out 32. He started working heavier with his two-seam fastball and his breaking ball made real strides. He sits mid-90s with his fastball, pairing a slider at 86-87 and a mid-80s changeup.

There’s still some nits to pick with Wilcox, his arm action is a little long and he’s not the most athletic pitcher. On top of that his previous bouts with control are well documented. So there’s some risk/reward in this pick. Was his early success simply a mirage or was it a talented pitcher coming into his own?
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21. Nick Bitsko – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 17 yr, Weight: 220 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Central Bucks East (PA)
One of the players hurt most by the cancellation of the season has to be Nick Bitsko — at least in terms of players at or near the top of the draft. Bitsko was seen as a sure top 10 pick in 2021 before reclassifying into the Class of 2020. That meant that he wasn’t a focus for scouts last summer as they knew the Pennsylvania prep arm had another year before being eligible. That was going to be fine when he had a season this spring to put on a show for decision makers, but Pennsylvania prep baseball didn’t get going before the season was put to an end, thus giving teams less of a look at Bitsko than you’d want to get at a guy you’re taking very high in the first round.

Talent wise Bitsko is right behind Mick Abel and Jared Kelley, but on the same tier, however with his lack of looks he may fall a bit in the first round. Bitsko is a 6-foot-4, 225 pound right hander with both a plus fastball and plus curve, along with a change that should be an above average pitch with more reps. Bitsko regularly hits 96 mph with the fastball, and could gain more as he still has some projection on his body. The curve works as a swing and miss offering already, and he has the ability to command each of his three pitches with the potential for a plus grade for the command as well. With his different situation for scouts, he is a guy who could go in the mid first round or slip towards the back end of the round. However if he slips too far a Virginia commitment could push him out of the draft.
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22. Tyler Soderstrom – C
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 200 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Turlock (CA)
The son of former sixth overall pick Steve Soderstrom, Tyler Soderstrom is the most intriguing catcher in this draft class. Of course you need to factor in the high risk demographic that is prep catchers, but this Southern California product is already a guy scouts are comfortable putting a plus hit tool on- which is extremely rare for catchers, let alone prep catchers. The power isn’t quite as impressive as the hit tool, but he should get to average as he continues to develop his body — which might come at the cost of his above average current athleticism.

The big question here is the defense, as Soderstrom needs a lot of work to be playable behind the plate though does have a plus arm to help the overall defensive package a bit. That level of work is needed as he doesn’t even start behind the dish for his high school often as they have a high end defender there. Soderstrom has at least proven himself against top high school competition both in-state and in national events, so the bat should play and could play at another position if he doesn’t make the progress needed behind the plate. One thing to point out is that as promising as he is, he isn’t going to be close to the bigs even by prep catchers standards as he will need all the reps he can get defensively.
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23. J.T. Ginn – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 192 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Mississippi State
Ginn is a polarizing prospect of this draft. When the season started he was on a clear cut path to being a first rounder, then he got hurt, underwent Tommy John and his draft position is in flux. His two plus pitches certainly make a good argument in his favor, they are also what made him a Dodgers first rounder as a prep arm.
The aforementioned pitchers are his fastball and slider. The fastball is an upper-90s pitch that gets some late life on it and his slider usually comes with the word ‘wipeout’ before it. Ginn also flashes a changeup.

His health is a big question heading into the draft. Some think there is reliever risk as well, but he’s a talented arm that someone should take a chance on earlier than later.
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24. Slade Cecconi – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 219 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Miami
Slade Cecconi looked like he was set to go in the first round in the 2018 draft, but injuries hampered his senior year and led him to stick to his commitment to the University of Miami. Two years later, Cecconi is again looking to make his way into the first round, and he has a decent chance to do so.

In terms of stuff, the 6-foot-4 right-hander can go toe to toe with almost anyone in the draft. His fastball regularly touches the high-90s, and he complements it with a hard slider that gets as high as 87 mph. Past that, scouts are divided on the quality of his third pitch. Some see his changeup as a potential third plus, while others question his ability to throw it consistently. Cecconi has decent control, as he’s able to throw strikes consistently, but his command could still use a lot of work. He also struggles to maintain his stuff late into starts, with his velocity dipping as he gets into the later innings. When you combine these two, people have concerns with Cecconi’s to remain a starting pitcher at the next level, believing he’ll instead slide into a reliever role. While he has the tools to be a solid RP, it would definitely cause his value to take a hit. Despite that, his stuff and projectable frame may be enough for a team in the late first round to take a chance on him, and if he can develop more consistency it could definitely be a worthwhile risk.
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25. Jordan Walker – 3B
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 17 yr, Weight: 220 lbs, Height: 6-5
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Decatur (GA)
One of the top prep bats in this draft and next on the list is Jordan Walker. Walker is an athletic freak, 6’5″ plenty of room to grow with plenty of present power. Walker is more athletic than his position and frame would give off initially. Although his bat coincides with the typical corner guy, Walker is fast, having run a 6.5 60-yard dash at last year’s PG National. Walker also has a great arm, as he has been a solid pitcher in the past, tagging lower 90s with his fastball. He also has impressive defense that will help to keep Walker at third.

Some concerns for Walker is his longer than normal swing that will most likely end up producing some swing and miss issues in the future. Walker is a very smart kid heavily committed to Duke, and will be tough to sign.
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26. Tanner Burns – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 205 lbs, Height: 6-0
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Auburn
One of the top high school arms from the 2017 class to make it to campus, Burns was stellar from day one at Auburn (career 2.86 ERA, 210/67 strikeout-to-walk ratio in 188.2 innings). He holds his 92-96 mph velocity deep into starts and works all four quadrants with the heater. Burns has no qualms going after hitters, and while the fastball’s not overpowering, he gets quite a few called strikes by working different areas of the zone. He’s particularly adept at locating glove-side, but his 3/4 arm slot allows him to manipulate the fastball horizontally, seemingly at will. His changeup shows a bit of arm-side fade and projects to average.

Developing a more consistent breaking ball could be the key for Burns reaching his mid-rotation ceiling. His current breaker has a slurve-type action and ranges from 78-84 mph; it’s possible, given that wide variation in velocity, he has both a curveball and slider that tend to blend together. He doesn’t have the vertical arm slot many teams covet for a true 12-6 hammer curve, so developing a tighter slider or cutter could be a speculative area of focus for his drafting team’s player development staff. Burns has been overshadowed a bit by the more high-octane arms in this year’s college class, but pitchers with his combination of above-average stuff, plus feel, and track record of dominance in the SEC don’t typically make it out the top 20 on draft day.
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27. Bobby Miller – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 220 lbs, Height: 6-5
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Louisville
After spending his first two seasons on campus in a swingman role, 2020 was supposed to be Miller’s first as a full-time member of Louisville’s rotation. Before the shutdown, Miller pitched a strong 23 innings, missing bats and limiting walks but there will no doubt be questions about his future role. Miller’s delivery also raises some questions, especially considering his upper half. There’s a severe head whack and spinal tilt here, but he’s athletic enough to overcome those red flags. His primary heater is a two-seamer, and the horizontal movement goes well with his secondaries; a plus slider that has hit 90, a changeup with good depth and a show-me curveball. We don’t project Miller as a huge strikeout arm but he should get a batter per inning while also sporting a strong groundball rate. Miller is a versatile arm that can fit many roles on a big league staff.
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28. Chris McMahon – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 205 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Miami
A highly touted draft prospect out of high school, McMahon is a former USA baseball standout and likely would’ve been a consensus top 15 pick in previous drafts. His delivery is simple and effortless, consistently repeating it and working in rhythm. This all-around effortless motion helps McMahon touch 98 mph with his fastball and typically sits in the 95-96 mph with late action. His best secondary offering is a tumbling changeup that works down in the zone and mimics his fastball. McMahon’s breaking ball is currently lacking, projecting out as an average pitch that he doesn’t always have the best feel for. If he goes to an organization that can improve his ability to spin and touch up a somewhat long arm path, McMahon could end up being a polished back-end starter at the major league level.
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29. Austin Wells – C
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 220 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Arizona
If the digital strike zone was implemented, Wells would likely be much more impressive for teams. Behind the plate, he’s got the raw tools to be a solid receiver, with athleticism to block pitches well, but with arm history issues that hurt his arm strength.

It’s that arm strength concern that really limits where Wells would fit on the field if not behind the plate. His bat may have some flaws, but many scouts feel his swing issues are fixable, not issues in timing or not seeing the ball well.

He is a draft-eligible sophomore, so he could go back to school as Wells worked hard on his defense over the 2019-20 offseason and really did not get a chance to show it, but if he goes off the board in the first round, the right organization could continue that development behind the plate or attempt to focus on his bat with a move elsewhere in the field.
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30. Daniel Cabrera – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 196 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Louisiana State
A sweet swinging lefty with a knack for the barrel, Cabrera has a long history of hitting dating back to his days on the showcase circuit. He’s since been a productive SEC hitter and a cog in one of the conference’s best lineups. His loose lefty swing has natural loft and above average bat speed. His real strength is his ability to adjust on pitches and mid-at bat. He’ll still struggle on breaking balls low and in but overall he shows great feel for the zone and excellent barrel control. He’s an average fielder with an above average arm, and it’s enough to play in a corner long term, though it might be left field long term. It’s a bat first profile with some peripheral skills to support his long term outcome.
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31. Bryce Jarvis – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 22 yr, Weight: 195 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Duke
The latest Driveline (and Cressey Sports Performance) success story, Jarvis opted to return to Duke despite being drafted (37th round) by the Yankees as a draft eligible sophomore. Simply put, the move paid off. Jarvis was able to tack on good weight to his thinner 6-foot-2 frame, jumping from 173 last spring to the mid 190’s today. Additionally, Jarvis was able to add velocity to his fastball, spin to his change and both power and spin to his slider/curve combo.

While Jarvis was a somewhat known commodity entering the year, his name value exploded when he threw a perfect game against Cornell and continued to dominate until the season was shut down due to Covid. Jarvis went 3-1 with a 0.67 ERA and 0.48 WHIP across 27 IP and four starts. He struck out 40 batters to just two walks.

Jarvis (who maxed at 92 mph last year) now sits 93-95 deep into starts and has touched 96 with a fastball he locates well. His best pitch is a low 80s changeup that has near identical spin rates as his fastball with similar arm speed. He throws a mid 80s slider with solid shape and bite, as well as an upper 70s curve. The slider and fastball are both above average pitches, with a genuine plus change and a solid average curve. It’s a starter’s pitch mix.

Jarvis has shown borderline plus command over his four starts this year, though there is some effort to his delivery and questions how his frame would hold up over a full season. He should be loved by analytically inclined teams and appears to have a very high floor with some potential for upside beyond his draft slot if the stuff he flashed in early 2020 holds up over a full season.
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32. Jared Jones – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 180 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: La Mirada (CA)
The best stuff in the prep class belongs to Jared Jones. The 6-foot-1, 180-pound Southern California native who is committed to Texas was a clear first rounder last summer, who dipped a bit over the summer, only to start moving his way back up the list this spring. The two-way player is athletic enough that he could actually be an outfielder of some value if his stuff on the mound wasn’t so overpowering, and he also comes from great bloodlines as his father played in the minors. Jones has consistently been 96-97 mph with the fastball, with a slider that can vary in both quality and shape- but is a plus pitch when it’s on. His change lags behind, as expected for a guy with his stuff, but is a third pitch that should eventually be at least average with work.

This is the part where you start to wonder why he only ranks here on the list after such positive comments, but his command is erratic right now and will need work to get to a 40 grade on a regular basis. With Jones athleticism there is hope that pro coaching could get him to make some adjustments and see the command take an uptick, even at the expense of a little bit of his raw stuff.
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33. Carson Montgomery – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 17 yr, Weight: 200 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Windermere (FL)
There are things to like about Montgomery. As a prep arm he brings up to mid-90s velocity with a nice slider. The 3/4 arm slot helps him to get some life on his fastball. He’s impressed enough where a team might grab early if they believe he can be signed away from his Florida State commitment.

The two-pitch combo is nice, but there’s no guarantee on his third pitch to come around. That two-pitch combination is nasty enough to carry him for now. He should have the necessary stuff to make the jump to pro ball if a team wants to grab him and sway him from his college commitment.
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34. Jordan Westburg – SS
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 191 lbs, Height: 6-3
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Mississippi State
Despite being undrafted out of high school, Jordan Westburg has grown into quite the prospect, as he has done nothing but improve since arriving at Mississippi State. Between his last two years at college and his 2019 showing at the cape, Westburg has been a very productive player, and has pushed himself into borderline first round contention.

While he likely doesn’t have any plus tools, Westburg provides a rare combination of power and speed with the ability to stick at shortstop. While probably not plus in either tool, Westburg’s power and speed both grade as above-average, although he has yet to truly show that in game yet. An aggressive hitter, Westburg has made great strides in cutting his strikeout rate. He still has some work to do when it comes to pitch recognition, but his hit tool is certainly passable.

In the field, Westburg will never be elite, but he’s got a great arm and a quick first step, along with decent hands. Westburg may fit better long term at third base, especially if he adds some muscle and slows down a bit, but in that situation the hope would be that his power becomes a distinct plus tool, and he’ll certainly profile offensively at third in that case. Whether or not he can tap into his raw power will be a huge factor for Westburg, and whichever team takes him will likely be banking on him doing so.
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35. Nick Loftin – SS
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 185 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Baylor
Nick Loftin is one of the top shortstops at the collegiate level this draft. He has one of the highest floors of collegiate position players in the draft with some of the best natural defensive talents. Loftin has a very good chance to stick at the six and can play all over the diamond, allowing for him to be a solid utility man at the next level. That is crucial to his success because his glove will carry the profile if the bat doesn’t come along.

Loftin has been a very consistent hitter throughout his career at Baylor, hitting for a career .856 OPS. He hit six home runs in both 2018 and 2019, but this spring he showed a more aggressive approach and much more power than what was initially thought of him. At the Shriners College Classic, Loftin hit a homerun over the train tracks in Minute Maid Park. Obviously an outlier, but Loftin is showing a higher potential to be able to pull balls thanks to that. Loftin has an excellent ability to barrel balls and cover the plate to all fields.
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36. Dillon Dingler – C
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 210 lbs, Height: 6-3
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Ohio State
The Ohio State product began his Buckeye career splitting time between centerfield and behind the plate, which isn’t a combination you see everyday. That’s part of what makes Dingler a special draft prospect. His athleticism is top of the scale for a backstop. The way he moves behind the plate and gets himself in front of everything, paired with his arm strength (50% caught stealing), makes him a potentially elite defender. The foundations of his offensive game is his ability to put the bat on the ball and his approach, but the power is coming. His abbreviated 2020 season saw big power numbers with five homers in 13 games. Dingler is surging up draft boards.
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37. Dylan Crews – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 190 lbs, Height: 6-0
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Lake Mary (FL)
Once considered right up there as a top prospect in the prep class, Crews struggled on the summer circuit last season with swing-and-miss issues against high level competition. The inconsistencies in his swing have hurt him, but when Crews is in sync, he’s shown the ability to hit for both average and power. His swing path is short with loose bat speed and the ball does have some life off the barrel when he finds it, but he isn’t consistent enough right now.

Crews is currently a center fielder with a feel for himself in the field and an above-average arm, but a transition to a corner spot is coming sooner rather than later. He’ll be able to hold his own on defense in that regard, but there are concerns that his offensive production may not mirror that of his glove. Crews has the talent to be an impact prospect but he’s too far away from that right now. We’ll probably see him at LSU in the fall, where he’ll be able to iron out some kinks and prepare for the 2022 MLB Draft.
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38. Carmen Mlodzinski – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 232 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: South Carolina
South Carolina has a history of guys not performing the best in school and being very sought-after draft prospects. Mlodzinski is the next in the line.

A great summer in the Cape really turned heads to Mlodzinski’s raw stuff, which is very impressive. He works with a plus fastball that touches 97-98 along with a slider and a cutter that sit above-average and can flash plus. The heater does have a tendency to flatten out, which is not a great effect for a bowling ball sinker like Mlodzinski has.

Mlodzinski is a tinkerer, working with a hard curve and a slow curve this spring along with multiple looks on a potential change. He may be a guy that’s more of an inning-eating #3/4 type, but that can have plenty of value and should see Mlodzinski off the board by the end of the second round.
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39. Gage Workman – 3B
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 195 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: S/R
School: Arizona State
A tooled college athlete presents a similar risk reward profile to a prep hitter. Workman is tooled up. He showcases excellent instincts, footwork, and a strong throwing arm at the hot corner. His defensive prowess is so strong that many evaluators believe he can potentially handle shortstop in pro-ball.

At the plate however, Workman is not nearly as refined. Blessed with above average speed and raw power, Workman a switch-hitter shows the ability to drive the ball from both sides of the plate. His approach on the other hand leaves much to be desired, as he’s overly aggressive and is prone to strikeouts without a high enough walk rate to support it. The refinement of Workman’s plate approach is paramount to projecting his future role. If he can get to the point of average plate discipline the tools and defensive profile should be enough to get him to the big leagues.
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40. Dax Fulton – LHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 225 lbs, Height: 6-6
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Mustang (OK)
Dax Fulton is what you love to find in a prep lefty. The Oklahoma prep is 6’6″, 225 with plenty of projection, a fastball already regularly in the low to mid 90s, a plus curve, and some feel for the changeup. Of course things aren’t that simple for Fulton, who missed the spring because of Tommy John surgery and also has a commitment to in-state Oklahoma that a team will need to buy him out of.

That said pre-TJ the fastball was 90-93 regularly and isn’t even his best pitch- that pitch being his curve that he shows feel for commanding and manipulating. The change is a bit behind since he hasn’t needed it much, but when he’s thrown it there are flashes of at least an average pitch. If a team believes in his health it shouldn’t be too hard to find a team willing to buy out his college commitment for a big, projectable lefty with stuff and pitchability.
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41. Drew Romo – C
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 205 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: S/R
School: The Woodlands (TX)
One of the best defensive catching prospects in recent history, Romo receives rave reviews universally for what he does behind the plate. Scouts praise every facet of his defensive game, from receiving skills, blocking, pitch calling to his strong arm. The starting catcher for Team USA two years in a row, Romo is conservatively a plus defender behind the plate with a plus arm that posts consistent sub-two second pop times in games and sub 1.8 in drills.

At the plate, Romo has a loose and easy swing from both sides of the plate and has average raw power, most of which he should get to in games. An up and down summer between showcase events and for Team USA at the plate caused some concerns about the hit tool and potential swing and miss. That said, at minimum he has showcased good patience at the plate and has an advanced feel for the zone for his age. Showcasing this, he led Team USA in walks last year. He is a solid athlete for the catcher position, despite being a below average runner, and has a good body for holding up at the position long term.

Overall, while Romo profiles to be an average hitter offensively (which is good enough for the current MLB threshold at the position) it’s the defense that gives him a chance to be drafted as early as late day one. Teams who anticipate robo umps may favor some of the more offensively friendly catchers in the class but even with robo umps, his blocking skills and arm would be an asset.
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42. Masyn Winn – RHP/SS
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 180 lbs, Height: 5-11
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Kingwood (TX)
Winn is a legitimate two-way player from Texas who is dripping with athleticism. Winn, a potential second round prospect as a shortstop alone, is built more in the shortstop mould at an athletic 5-foot-11, 180 pounds. As such, he doesn’t have the same leverage as many other top arms. That said, he has some of the best pure stuff in the class.

Winn sits 94-97 with his fastball and consistently touches 98 both on the mound and on the diamond. He pairs the heat with a power curve that flashes plus and sits 78-82 mph. Both the fastball and curve have exceptional spin rates with the latter averaging 2900 rpm in Jupiter. Reports of a changeup that is inconsistent but flashes plus with up to 15 mph of velocity separation from the fastball are floating around.

Winn has genuine 80 grade arm speed and a simple delivery that looks like an infielder on the mound. He will turn his head at the end of his delivery, leading to some inconsistent release points, but it looks much easier to clean up than traditional head-whack.

On day three of Jupiter, he went 3 for 4 with a 2B, 3B and a HR while throwing 3 scoreless innings. But conversely, he was sent home early from the PDP league, causing some to question his makeup.

As likely a round two player either as an arm or as a shortstop, Winn has big time upside if he chooses the mound. A ceiling of three plus pitches, triple digit velocity, and the athleticism to clean up his delivery and repeat loom. That said, he may well wind up a shortstop and pen arm, where his stuff would play up.
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43. Clayton Beeter – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 220 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Texas Tech
When you talk about the risers of this draft, Beeter’s name will come up early. He’s seen his stock increase quite a bit as the draft nears. Armed with a very nice breaking pitch and a fastball that climbs into the upper 90s, the Texas Tech product is impressive with the ability he’s shown to miss bats.

There’s quite a bit of reliever risk in his delivery because of some violence. On top of that he does lack a true third pitch. However, even as a reliever his stuff is nasty and should play up to allow him to potentially be a closer.

Another thing to keep in mind with Beeter is that in the pre-draft video series on Prospects Live, Brian Sakowski of Perfect Game said he was a really nice spin rate guy. Swing and miss and spin rate make him a very interesting draft prospect.
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44. Alika Williams – SS
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 180 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Arizona State
While most of the eyes were on Spencer Torkelson during Arizona State’s games in the shortened 2020 season, the left side of their infield also had quite a bit of talent in third baseman Gage Workman and shortstop Alika Williams. While both have draft pedigree, Alika Williams is widely regarded as the guy who will be selected first, and could even sneak into the first round.
While not a flashy player, Alika Williams is one of the safer players in this draft, as his toolset screams everyday player.

Where Williams shines is on the defensive side, where he will almost certainly be able to stick at shortstop long term. While neither his speed or arm stand out, both range from passable to above-average and play up due to his quick footwork and hands.

At the plate Williams doesn’t stand out, but he still has the potential to be a decent contributor. His best asset offensively is his bat to ball skills, as evidenced by his 8.9 K% in his three years at Arizona State. That number was even lower during the shortened season, sitting at 5.1 percent, with 10 more walks than strikeouts since the start of the 2019 season.

The major downfall in Williams’ game is his lack of power, but he did manage to improve in that regard last year, going from nine extra-base hits as a freshman to 19 as a sophomore. Power will still never be a big part of Williams’ game, but with his glove, as well as a decent hit tool, Williams has the makings of a decent glove-first everyday shortstop.
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45. Nick Swiney – LHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 187 lbs, Height: 6-3
Hits/Throws: R/L
School: North Carolina State
A lefty changeup artist, Swiney was off to an excellent start to his first year in NC State’s rotation before the season cancellation. He works 89-92 mph from an over-the-top arm slot. It’s not overpowering, but he sells the arm speed on his plus changeup well enough to keep hitters off balance. His breaking ball gets slurvy at times but projects to average.

Swiney gets down the mound well, but his delivery has a bit of a reliever look to it with massive head movement at release. He’s a very good athlete, though, and was commanding all three of his pitches this season. Because he spent his first two years in the Wolfpack bullpen, Swiney has less mileage on his arm than is typical for a college junior, having thrown just 115.1 career innings in Raleigh.
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46. Alex Santos – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 185 lbs, Height: 6-3
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Mount St. Michael Academy (NY)
Santos is one of the best coming out of the northeast this year, and one of the best in the entire class. Santos is a lean 6-foot-4, 204 pounds, with more room to grow. Already sitting low 90s with his frame, an increase to his velo is forthcoming.

Santos works solely out of the stretch and shows loose arm action from a high 3/4 arm slot. Santos’ fastball runs armside at 94, usually around 2500 RPM with late sinking action. His second best pitch is his slider that he will use as a go to out pitch. The pitch is the typical topspin slider around 80 mph that shows plenty of promise with the ability to miss bats easily. Another pitch that Santos has been working on and has flashed from time to time is his changeup. The chaneup is around the mid-80s, and it’s something he’s working on the most to bolster his artillery.

A solid third pitch could be crucial to Santos as it makes the repertoire much more intriguing for teams and success at the professional level. Santos has a bulldog mentality and holds himself to that, something to like in a pitcher.
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47. Cole Henry – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 211 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Louisiana State
An athletic thrower when he first arrived in Baton Rouge, Henry has continued to make strides over the last two seasons. He features a three-pitch arsenal consistent of a fastball in the 91-95 mph range, a curveball in the upper-70s with 11-5 break, and a mid-80s changeup that can get firm at times.

It’s a fastball dominant approach, and when Henry’s on time mechanically it shows the characteristics of a plus pitch. He will struggle to command it at times, catching too much of the heart of the plate. His secondaries are inconsistent offerings with moments of brilliance but overall grade out to average.

He struggles with timing despite a somewhat basic operation, and his late follow throw lends itself to a noticeable head knock. Warts aside, Henry provides a strong starters foundation with three pitches he can throw for strikes, and a history of improving in all facets year over year. Good bet for a team in the second.
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48. CJ Van Eyk – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 198 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Florida State
A well-regarded prospect out of high school, Van Eyk was a bit up-and-down at Florida State. He works 91-95 mph deep into starts, but the fastball doesn’t have bat-missing carry at the top of the zone. His gaudy collegiate strikeout totals are driven by heavy use of promising but inconsistent secondaries.

His slider (83-85 mph) and curve (79-82 mph) are distinct pitches and flash above-average to plus when he’s on, but his feel for each varies wildly, sometimes within the same start. He has better control of an above-average changeup (83-85 mph), which he’ll throw to hitters of either handedness. On stuff alone, he looks like a potential #4 starter.

But Van Eyk’s an average athlete with fringy, inconsistent control. He issued 4.11 Bb/9 over his three seasons in Tallahassee and never seemed to make consistent progress throwing strikes. Perhaps a pro player development team can tease out better command with minor mechanical tweaks since there’s nothing glaringly wrong with his delivery.
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49. Justin Foscue – 2B
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 197 lbs, Height: 6-0
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Mississippi State
Twenty years ago, Foscue would be viewed as an ideal guy to draft as a #2 or #7 hitter and play at second or third base for a steady, albeit not spectacular, glove. Think Todd Walker.

Foscue in the modern game is going to be viewed by teams based on how much of his raw power they believe he can tap into and whether he could stick at second base. If he could handle second and tap into the power that flashes raw in batting practice, he could be an easy mid-first round guy. He will be a high-floor sort of pick in the early- to mid-second round for most teams even if they don’t see him maxing out up the middle with big raw, though.
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50. Aaron Sabato – 1B
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 230 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: S/R
School: North Carolina
Power. It starts there with the hulking Tarheels first baseman. At 6-foot-2, 230 pounds Sabato is built like an NFL fullback and in many ways he impacts the ball like a lead blocker, posting 100+ mph exit velocities dating back to his days as a prep prospect in New York.

A draft eligible sophomore, Sabato quickly became one of the most feared hitters in the ACC his freshman season slashing, .343/.453/.696 with 18 home runs and 25 doubles over 64 games. There’s some question about his bat speed, and ability to catch up to elevated velocity, but he did a good job early this spring of showing improvements in that regard. There’s a real chance four years from now Sabato is one of the best hitters from the 2020 college class.

The knocks on his profile are predominantly on the other side of the ball where Sabato is likely pigeonholed to first base. His right handed hitting/throwing profile only complicates matters as it’s a less than ideal according to conventional wisdom. Despite this the bat is special enough to land Sabato somewhere on Day One of the draft.
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51. Casey Martin – SS
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 175 lbs, Height: 5-11
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Arkansas
Once considered a top 10 pick, 2020 has been a bit of a fall from grace for Martin but the raw tools that made him such an exciting prospect are still there. Martin has truly exciting natural athleticism with the ability to play a plethora of positions defensively and some upside at the plate. The question is just how early teams will be willing to gamble on upside given some of the inherent issues with his current approach.

At the plate, Martin is one of the rare players whose game power is above his raw power. The 5-foot-11, 175 pound Martin has average raw power if you’re being generous but it might be closer to fringe. While his full season track record of 13 home runs in 2018 and 15 in 2019 suggest massive raw power, it’s more due to the extreme loft in his swing. We haven’t yet seen much of Martin with a wood bat, so there is risk that metal bats played a factor as well. Given the loft to his swing, Martin’s game power should actually be a tick above average, but it comes with a heavy price.

Martin has extreme swing and miss and his launch angle indicates he should have a low BABIP for a player with his speed. Martin’s best year at the plate was his freshman year, but even then he struck out 22 percent of the time. That number rose to 24.4 in 2019 and was up to 31 in the shortened 2020. Simply put, that’s not what you want to see. Many MLB teams want to see college hitters post walk totals above their strikeout totals, so the fact that in three years Martin hasn’t yet posted a walk number that was even half of his strikeout total is troubling. It’s worse when you note that instead of taking steps forward in this regard, he has gone backwards each year.

Martin could likely tone down the strikeouts by altering his bat path to reduce the strikeout totals, but it would likely come at the cost of his game power. It’s tough for us to envision a scenario where Martin can have an average hit tool without his power maxing out at average as well. Additionally, swing changes are notoriously risky as well. The profile in many ways is similar to Jeremy Eierman, who fell later than many expected in the draft and has struggled thus far in the minors to make contact.

So why draft Martin? While Martin is a mediocre defender at short, he can make the highlight reel plays at a high clip and could certainly stay at the position if he can play more under control. He played third base as a freshman and has plenty of arm strength to handle the position. His build lends itself to 2B well. However many project him best to center field due to his above average arm and legit 70 or better foot speed. He has the upside to become a truly dynamic defensive center fielder with the arm to play in right if needed. Many teams value this kind of chess piece. He also adds good value on the basepaths with both his footspeed and a solid baserunning IQ.

While Martin comes with some big risks, he’s still one of the flashier players in the class with his raw tools and a solid track record in SEC play. Teams with the, “Always bet on the athlete,” mantra will be tempted to gamble on Martin’s upside as early as late day one. One of the bigger risk/reward players in the class.
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52. Tommy Mace – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 200 lbs, Height: 6-6
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Florida
Mace works 90-94 mph with a fastball with sink and arm-side tail. It’s a ground ball pitch, not a swing-and-miss offering, but he can go to his above-average slider for whiffs, especially against right-handed hitters. An average athlete, Mace doesn’t have pinpoint command within the zone, but his delivery is simple and under control and he’s typically around the strike zone. If he can develop a more trustworthy changeup in pro ball, he’ll have a shot to crack the back of a rotation. If not, he’s likely to end up as a reliever.
Photo credit: MLB
53. Freddy Zamora – SS
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 190 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Miami
Zamora was slowed by a knee injury in 2020, which only added to his stock dropping after a suspension for violating a team rule. Overall, though, he is a solid selection. He gets praised for his defensive ability more than anything, and he’s got above average speed to boot. At times his bat has shown through as well.

Outside of the injury, the biggest knock to Zamora is consistency. He’s flashed the ability to have every tool in the shed, which is why he’s still in conversations as high as he is. If he can come back from injury and show that his talents are real then someone will be getting a very nice discount on a shortstop.
Photo credit: MLB
54. Zach DeLoach – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 210 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Texas A&M
Few players have raised their stock over the past 10 months or so as much as Zach DeLoach has. After following up a decent yet unspectacular freshman year with a rough 2019, in which he slashed .200/.318/.294, DeLoach’s name was nowhere to be seen in draft talk, especially in early rounds.

He managed to turn that around last summer with a great showing in the Cape Cod League, where he took home the batting title, slashing .353/.428/.541. He continued to improve even more in the shortened 2020 season, slashing a ridiculous .421/.547/.789 with six home runs and six stolen bases through 18 games. DeLoach is a great example of a player with a great all-around package, without any real standout tools. You likely can’t make the argument for any of DeLoach’s tools being higher than 55, but you also probably wouldn’t be able to say any are lower than 50 either.

DeLoach’s most consistent asset throughout college has been his approach, as he’s walked more than he’s struck out over his career, including 14 walks to three strikeouts in 2020. The increase in power is the real selling point for DeLoach, as he came into 2020 noticeably bulked up. DeLoach has a very simple, clean swing to go along with decent bat speed, which he finally turned into home run power in 2020. Whether or not teams buy into that power will determine how high DeLoach ends up going in the draft.

He’s a solid runner, but not a burner in the outfield or a huge base stealing threat. With decent speed and a solid arm, DeLoach has gotten some chances in centerfield, but his average route running and instincts will likely make him a corner outfielder at the next level. If DeLoach can continue to be the player he was in the short 2020 season, he may end up being a steal.
Photo credit: MLB
55. Kevin Parada – C
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 200 lbs, Height: 6-0
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Loyola (CA)
Parada is a 6-foot, 192 pound catcher out of Pasadena, California and one of the many interesting prep catchers in this year’s draft. Parada has tons of potential in his bat and has shown up many different times throughout the many events he has appeared in, showcasing an ability to hit for power and average. Parada shows excellent bat speed with easy power to the pull side but does show promise to all fields.

Behind the plate, Parada’s defense is average but shows an above average arm. Some questions remain on if Parada will be able to stick behind the plate, but Parada is athletic enough to potentially play elsewhere. However, don’t be surprised if Parada and the other prep backstops make their way to campus as many GMs have trended away from risking a prep catcher. A very shortened draft certainly doesn’t help that either.
Photo credit: MLB
56. Justin Lange – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 220 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Llano (TX)
One of the biggest helium guys in the entire country this spring is Justin Lange. The Texas prep pitcher came from out of nowhere thanks to a big velocity spike, and went from a guy with no chance to be drafted in the shortened format to a guy getting at least some buzz to sneak into the first round. Lange is what you think of when you think prototypical Texas power pitcher- a 6-foot-4, 220 pound frame and a fastball that has reportedly hit 100 mph this spring. In addition to a great starter’s frame Lange is also an excellent athlete, helping to project that he is a pitcher who can keep developing- important because as good as the fastball is, the rest of him just isn’t at that level yet.

The fastball might touch 100 mph, but he typically sits more mid 90s to be able to get better movement and command on the pitch. His second best pitch would be his hard slider, which is still raw but has at least flashed signs of being a future second plus pitch. His change really lags behind, but then again you could say the same for a lot of prep pitchers who have the velo to hit 100 mph. Lange brings a bunch of red flags for a high pick, between the limited track record, command that is a work in progress, and secondary pitches that are both raw. A team taking Lange is taking him more as a building block for high upside rather than as a guy who can move fast.
Photo credit: MLB
57. Jared Shuster – LHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 210 lbs, Height: 6-3
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Wake Forest
In a strong year for collegiate left-handers, Wake Forest’s Jared Shuster might be the most interesting of the group. The 6-foot-3 southpaw has transformed from a soft-tossing lefty with scattershot command into a strike-throwing, bat missing arm that can hit 95-97. He features a plus changeup with a developing slider, all which come from an unusual over-the-top arm slot. Shuster struggled in 2019 with a 6.70 ERA but a strong stint on the Cape fueled his strong 2020 season. His 43 strikeouts to four walks in 26 innings is enough of a sample to get the lefty off the board in the top 50 picks.
Photo credit: MLB
58. Cayden Wallace – 3B
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 205 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Greenbrier (AR)
An Arkansas native, Wallace is the top prep player in the state and brings a physical presence into the batter’s box for an 18-year-old. At the plate, Wallace is a power-over-hit type of batter, but his hit tool isn’t as far behind as other power hitters in this class. His swing takes a short path to the ball with easy bat speed that allows him to generate whippy power from his hands. He posted some elite exit velocity numbers with a wood bat at the Perfect Game National Showcase last June and he just flat-out impacts the baseball with ferocity when he finds the barrel.

His mechanics and footwork at third base are raw but there’s certainly room for improvement to be made given his age. It’s likely that Wallace sticks at third base in the long-term given his athleticism and unique arm strength that has touched 93 mph on the mound in the past. Wallace is a hometown kid committed to Arkansas, which may ultimately lead to signability concerns.
Photo credit: MLB
59. Kyle Harrison – LHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 200 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/L
School: De La Salle (CA)
Every report on Harrison mentions two things– angle and feel. Harrison works from a lower slot in his delivery, and that makes it tough for hitters to pick up his fastball that sits low-90s with unique late movement due to his slot position. He has a very good feel for a sweeping breaker that can have sweeping slider break at times or big, looping curve break at others. When he falls in between with a slurvy break the pitch can get hit, so he will need to polish up his feel for both extremes on gripping the pitch, but he is cognizant of the grip changes to get the varying ends of break.

Harrison has a commitment to UCLA and could head there if he falls out of the second round. Staying on top of his breaker with his grip at his arm angle would allow his repeatable delivery and natural athleticism from the left side to project easily as a mid-rotation arm.
Photo credit: MLB
60. Victor Mederos – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 220 lbs, Height: 6-3
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Westminster Christian (FL)
Mederos has a shockingly large frame for a 19-year-old, checking in at 6-foot-4, 215 pounds. It’s a frame that’s going to require some maintenance to get the most out of his stuff. Mederos has an unusual and loose delivery and struggles finding a consistent release point, and getting control of his body will play a strong role in improving that.

The Cuban-born righty was sitting 92-94 during his one inning stint at the Under Armour showcase, and actually was named the MVP of the game after striking out all three batters he faced. He got ahead of hitters with that fastball, but used the sinking change and his tight slider to put hitters away. He also throws a high-spin curveball which gets plus grades due to its depth and power. His slider and changeup should be at least average pitches, rounding out an advanced arsenal. He’s a tough kid mentally, having defected from Cuba as a young boy, and brings that unflappable attitude with him to the mound.
Photo credit: MLB
61. Tanner Witt – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 17 yr, Weight: 200 lbs, Height: 6-6
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Episcopal (TX)
Witt is an athletic, tall, hyper-projectable Texas prep righty built like Ethan HankinsKris Bryant. But this summer, it was the arm that stole the show.

Witt has a simple delivery, with a slightly longer arm action that could easily be altered to hide the ball a bit better. Witt was 89-93 with riding action on a fastball that touched 94 with high end velo projection remaining.

His best pitch was a monstrous 10/4 curve that he showed elite feel for. He will throw the pitch in any count, showing both control and command beyond his fastball. The pitch has big time shape and depth and truly unreal spin, testing out between 2700-3000 rpm in games. Witt’s fastball also sat with spin rates over 2500, giving him a profile and frame similar to Dustin May, though Witt’s fastball is more run than sink.

Witt mixes in a changeup that mimics his fastball arm action well, but is a bit firm at 78-82 mph. It will need time to develop but has a very high ceiling.

Witt is a genuine 3B prospect, standing out in showcases for his contact, approach and power, as well as posting a 1.195 OPS for Team USA in 2017. This could hinder his pitching development but most teams see his best future on the mound. Witt’s dad is a former MLB player, who is the hitting coach for the Marlins High-A team. Witt is also one of the younger players in the class and will be 17 for a full month after the draft.

His age, frame, stuff, spin, pedigree, heritage and a chance to shine in Texas give him a real chance to be a true helium name that vaults into the first round come draft time.
Photo credit: MLB
62. Alejandro Rosario – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 170 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Miami Christian (FL)
Rosario is potentially one of the most electric arms in this upcoming draft on the prep side with many things to be intrigued about. Rosario has one of the hardest fastballs in the draft throwing 94-97 all of last summer. Rosario was impressive in the Under Armor All America game, as well as in the U-18 Baseball World Cup with Team USA where he threw the fastest pitch of the tournament.

Rosario throws both a four seam and a two-seam fastball. The four-seam has more velocity but the two-seam has a significant armside run and he will not hesitate to throw both over bats. The two-seamer has a chance to be a really special pitch, as he has the ability to have it tag the inside of the plate against left-handed hitters. Rosario usually pairs the fastball with his splitter. Rosarios’s splitter is a solid out pitch and can mix up hitters while he works his two-seamer horizontally. However, if he struggles with getting enough action on the splitter, it can easily hang.

Rosario’s biggest question is the lack of a solid third pitch, although he has been working on a cutter/slider. Rosario usually works this pitch away from right handed hitters and it can take different forms based on how hard he throws it. Rosario also can be susceptible to overthrowing and trading accuracy for speed, but sometimes results in major league level pitches.
Photo credit: MLB
63. Kyle Nicolas – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 225 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Ball State
Few players in baseball could’ve used a full 2020 season more than Kyle Nicolas. After a rough first two years to his college career, which featured a BB% of 18.2 and an ERA north of five, Nicolas was really starting to put it together in his junior year. Through 4 starts, totalling 23 innings, Nicolas had allowed just seven runs while striking out 37, and most notably only walking seven. This was headlined by an incredible final start against Sacred Heart, where he struck out 17 over seven innings, allowing just one hit and one walk along the way.

Stuff has never been an issue for Nicolas, as his arsenal has always arguably featured two plus pitches in a fastball that hits triple digits and a high 80s slider with sharp vertical break. He also has a curveball which shows potential at times, but could use some work to consistently become a distinct pitch from his slider. His changeup, which should be his third pitch, hasn’t shown much promise yet, and is definitely something that Nicolas needs to work on to remain a starter at the next level.

While his control improved drastically in 2020 with the simplification of his mechanics, Nicolas’ ability to throw strikes is still in question given his track record, so he definitely has a ton of reliever risk. At 6-foot-4, Nicolas has the frame of a starter, and he’s shown the ability to make adjustments, so whatever team drafts him will have both a difficult and extremely promising task when it comes to developing him as a starter.
Photo credit: MLB
64. Casey Schmitt – 3B/RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 200 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: San Diego State
One of the few true two-way players in the draft, Casey Schmitt provides us with one of the most interesting profiles in all of baseball. While Schmitt has had a decent career in college, as well as a solid showing at the Cape, both on the mound and as a hitter, he also hasn’t necessarily stood out at either.

As a hitter Schmitt has the looks of an everyday third baseman. He’s a solid fielder, with both quick hands and a cannon for an arm at third base. He’s also decent, but unspectacular with the bat in his hands, as he has yet to tap into his raw power yet. Most scouts would agree that he shows above-average raw power, but has yet to translate it into games yet. Getting more consistent power and hard contact will be a key to Schmitt’s ability to remain a third baseman.

On the mound, Schmitt has had a consistent career as San Diego State’s closer, racking up 23 saves over his three years. His arsenal isn’t anything special, but it features a decent fastball/splitter combination, as well as a curveball that’s a bit behind. He has simple and clean mechanics, and does a decent job of throwing strikes consistently. It will be interesting to see how Schmitt is used at the next level, but it’s not hard to see him having a similar career to Angels’ Jared Walsh, as a power hitting infielder and reliever.
Photo credit: MLB
65. Logan Allen – LHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 180 lbs, Height: 6-0
Hits/Throws: R/L
School: Florida International
Logan Allen has always been one of the largest names since coming out of high school in 2017. With 2020 finally here, Allen may finally find his professional home after turning down the Orioles in 2017. Allen was coming off of strong performances over the past year, with strong appearances on the Cape and with the Collegiate National League.

What Allen does well is focusing on his pitchability. Allen isn’t the type of guy to blow you away with velo but he excels in trusting his stuff and knowing how to attack hitters with different offerings. Allen usually sits 90-92 mph with his fastball and pairs it extremely well with a plus circle change around 80 mph. Allens uses the changeup as a way to get hitters to chase and produces strong swing and miss results. The changeup tunnels extremely well with not only the fastball but also with his slider. The slider is also low 80s and breaks hard. Allen sells both of these pitches very well with similar arm speeds in addition to the tunneling. When used correctly together, Allen keeps hitters guessing with the 3 good pitches in his arsenal.

Allen also doesn’t walk many batters, showing good command. Thanks to his ultra-pitchability, Allen has one of the highest floors for this class. However, his lower velo, smaller size (6-foot-1, 195 pounds) and low ceiling leaves more to be desired with Allen. Allen is a very safe pick who easily can become a middle-to-backend of the rotation kind of guy.
Photo credit: MLB
66. Ben Hernandez – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 205 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: De La Salle (IL)
Hernandez broke onto the draft scene in the winter of 2019 where his fastball sat in the low-to-mid 90s at a PBR event prior to his junior season. He then went on to absolutely dominate the summer circuit, stringing together several impressive performances at numerous events and with Team USA as well. His performance in front of our own Diego Solares and Matt Thompson at the PBR Super 60 was impressive enough to solidify himself as a top 70 prospect in this class.

Hernandez boasts a strong, proportional build that is durable enough to hold a starter’s workload. His delivery is straight to the point and he repeats it incredibly well, which is a main reason why he’s able to consistently fill up the zone. He pumps his fastball in the mid-90s with easy command to both sides of the plate and holds velocity into his starts. Hernandez is widely regarded by evaluators for having the top changeup in this class: a true 70-grade pitch with Bugs Bunny-like actions to it that serves as his go-to putaway pitch.

Contrary to that masterpiece is his inability to consistently spin some sort of breaking pitch, which is quite literally the only thing holding Hernandez back from being in first round discussions. Going to an organization that could aid him in developing at least an average breaking ball, whether it be vertical or horizontal spin, would untap an absolute gem that could end up being the steal from this class.
Photo credit: MLB
67. Blaze Jordan – 1B
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 17 yr, Weight: 220 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: DeSoto Central (MS)
Blaze may be the most famous prep prospect since Bryce Harper after being dubbed the next Harper on the cover of Sports Illustrated as a young teen. The power potential here is huge, and the 70-grade thump and his batting practice sessions are a joy to watch. Jordan re-classified late in 2019 to make himself eligible for the 2020 draft class, and is the type of player that is likely graded very differently from org to org.

The track record of right/right first baseman historically isn’t great, but we just had teams invest significant draft value in Andrew Vaughn and Spencer Torkelson so if you can hit teams will invest. Jordan is committed to Mississippi State and if he goes to college he could very well find himself in the top 10 conversation in three years. We do think the hit tool can be at least average, which is enough to get into his big raw pop. Defensively he’s first base only in our opinion, but if he hits it doesn’t matter that much.
Photo credit: MLB
68. Petey Halpin – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 17 yr, Weight: 180 lbs, Height: 6-0
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: St. Francis (CA)
One of the best pure athletes in this class, Halpin is a twitchy outfielder who has wildly flown under the radar in draft talks this season. He didn’t earn an invitation to the two major All-American games but shined down in Florida at the PDP league and at the Area Code games later on in the summer.

Halpin’s swing is short with loose hands that produce easy bat speed and enable him to consistently make steady line drive contact. He’s a hit-over-power type of bat right now, but he’s flashed at least average power into the gaps that’ll likely translate into high doubles numbers moving forward.

His 60-grade wheels and 60-grade arm suggest that his future lies as a center fielder that’ll impact the game with his pure athleticism. It’s likely that Halpin gets to campus this fall, but it’s also possible that he’s this year’s Hudson Head in a sense that a team may be willing to give him overslot money in the third or fourth round to ensure that he joins the professional ranks. If Halpin does go to school he will immediately become one of the top college prospects to watch for when he’s eligible for the draft again.
Photo credit: MLB
69. Cam Brown – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 210 lbs, Height: 6-3
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Flower Mound (TX)
Your opinion of Brown is heavily weighted on when you saw him. Those who saw plenty of Brown last summer have very high opinions of him as he flashed a fastball touching mid-90s along with a wicked slider and a change that Brown could manipulate and control.

Those that saw Brown in his limited views from this spring saw a guy who struggled to hold his velocity, had less bite on his breaking pitch, and couldn’t find consistent feel on the change.

With that disparity, it’s possible that Brown ends up falling some and makes his way to TCU, though his summer profile certainly fits the type of player that would be a target of a team like Houston or Milwaukee in the second or third round.
Photo credit: MLB
70. Drew Bowser – 3B
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 205 lbs, Height: 6-3
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Harvard-Westlake (CA)
A high school teammate of Pete Crow-Armstrong at legendary Harvard-Westlake High School, Bowser is a standout in his own right, ranking among the top five prep shortstops in this class. Blessed with a tall (6-foot-3), strong, athletic frame, Bowser has turned heads for his upside on both sides of the ball.

His strong arm and nimble footwork allow him to handle short despite the build of a prototypical third baseman. He’s likely to slide to the hit corner long term where he can flourish defensively.

At the plate Bowser is still mastering his body, struggling to fully engage his lower half. Despite this, Bowser has posted 100+ mph exit velocities, hinted to untapped power ceiling as he masters his swing mechanics. A strong commit to Stanford, there are some questions around Bowser’s signability. The California Prep Star still presents an opportunity for a team to go over slot in the second and meet his number.
Photo credit: MLB
71. Parker Chavers – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 185 lbs, Height: 5-11
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Coastal Carolina
A shoulder injury cost Chavers a chance to play in the shortened 2020 season, but he appears to be healthy again, and has a solid track record to lean on. Chavers has some swing and miss issues at the plate, but he offers solid raw power that’s been backed by wood bat play on the Cape, a plus run tool and fantastic outfield defense.

At the plate, Chavers has a loft-geared left-handed swing, with a big leg kick and solid bat speed. Chavers has above average raw power that he currently gets to most of in games, but it comes at a cost. Chavers gets too aggressive in his pursuit of home runs at times, getting too pull-heavy and swinging too hard to hold off on quality spin. The natural loft aids his power but can see him swing through pitches at times.

That said, he isn’t a zero from a patience perspective, and could develop a solid eye at the plate with reps. Chavers proved his 15 home run 2019 season wasn’t a fluke on the Cape with 14 extra base hits in just 122 at bats with a wood bat on the Cape. He also proved he can hold up decently against quality pitching (despite a 25 percent K rate). For now he projects as a future 45 hit and 55 game power bat.

A plus runner, Chavers has very good instincts on the base paths and could be a 20 stolen base threat at the next level. That speed aids him well in the outfield as well. When combined with excellent jumps, Chavers speed gives him a chance to not only stick in center, but become a true plus glove at the position. Should he have to move to right down the line, Chavers has an above average arm that would play well at the position.

While Chavers’ health and hit tool concerns do drop his stock a bit, the upside and track record are too much to ignore. If it all comes together for Chavers, you will have a 20/20 centerfielder, and that’s always going to be a valuable asset in the system.
Photo credit: MLB
72. Jeff Criswell – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 225 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Michigan
Criswell’s a lower-slot righty whose bread-and-butter is a mid-90s sinker. He holds his 93-96 mph velocity deep into starts, and uses the pitch to include a ton of ground balls. His mid-80s slider is his top secondary, flashing above-average two-plane movement. He sparingly uses a below-average changeup. A fringe athlete, Criswell has a high-effort delivery and below-average control, evidenced by a career 4.53 BB/9 at Michigan. He’ll no doubt get a long leash as a starter in the minors, but he’s probably best suited for a power relief role long-term.
Photo credit: MLB
73. Cade Horton – RHP/SS
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 190 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Norman (OK)
A supremely athletic specimen who, at this time next year, could be a hitter, pitcher, quarterback, or all of the above.

This University of Oklahoma quarterback commit, doubles as Oklahoma’s baseball Gatorade Player of the Year. The athletic righty will be allowed to play baseball in college should he make it there. If that’s not enough for you, he’s a two-way player threat too.

The pitching version of Horton throws a fastball that has touched mid 90s, and a slider that has plus potential. As a batter he uses a pretty simple load to lead to a compact swing. As you would imagine his athleticism makes him a solid defender as well. He could do well going either way.

Thus remains the question only Horton can answer, will football be able to pull him to campus?
Photo credit: MLB
74. Luke Little – LHP/1B
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 19 yr, Weight: 220 lbs, Height: 6-8
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: San Jacinto CC
A big lefty with a fastball to match, the command needs work.

Remember the viral video of the left-handed draft prospect hitting 105 mph on the radar gun? That tall southpaw was JUCO bandit Luke Little. The name and the 6’8″ frame don’t mix very well, but he is in control of those long limbs during his delivery. That big fastball is only one of his offerings, as he adds a slider that gets some really nice break.

The knock on Little is the same knock on many hard throwers, the command isn’t there. He was showing improvements to start the 2020 season before it was cut short, posting a 17/3 K/BB ratio in nine innings.

There is a team that will buy into his size and premium velocity. The only question will be if he can reign it in enough to make an impact at the pro level.
Photo credit: Perfect Game
75. Harold Coll – SS
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 185 lbs, Height: 5-11
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Georgia Premier Academy
One of the more controversial players in rankings this year is shortstop Harold Coll, as there seems to be a divide in his rankings between different sites. Coll presents an interesting prospect. A shortstop who will end up there with his plus defense and plus arm, combined with a bat that has made progress in the last year. And factoring in that this kid was previously a cold weather prospect who missed his junior season because his school didn’t have enough players to field a team. Coll devoted himself to the game this past year, transferring to Georgia Premier Academy- the school which produced Daniel Espino last year, and really working on his body and game. His defense is going to be what gets him drafted, as he is one of the top defenders in the prep class, but it is his bat that gives him a real shot to get signed away from his North Carolina commitment. Coll has well above average raw power, and could be a future plus grade, while having the bat speed to be an at least average hitter. That defense and bat combination makes him one of the best prep shortstops in the class- you can at least argue to put him on the same tier as any of them outside of top guy Ed Howard.
Photo credit: Perfect Game
76. Hudson Haskin – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 200 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Tulane
One of the younger players in the class. Haskin has a career .372/.459/.647 in his year-plus at Tulane. He has an unorthodox, high-effort swing; he works deep into a crouch mid-cut and swings exceptionally hard, with visible head movement just after the contact point. It doesn’t seem like it should work, but Haskin has special hand-eye coordination and hasn’t had any strikeout problems to this point (albeit in a non-Power Five conference). That aggressiveness has helped him tap into his above-average pull-side power. An above-average runner, Haskin has played center field in college but might fit better in left in pro ball.
Photo credit: MLB
77. Kevin Abel – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 200 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Oregon State
You probably remember Kevin Abel from 2018 when he was the best pitcher on Oregon State’s National Championship team as a freshman. Unfortunately the young righty has dealt with back and arm injuries since then, and hasn’t thrown a pitch for Oregon State since April of 2019. When healthy Abel is an advanced pitchability right-hander with plus command and intelligence, that has three above-average pitches or better. Abel’s changeup is a plus pitch, and may be even more than that, because it looks just like the fastball the whole way before dropping off the table. His curveball is an above-average pitch, with strong depth that he works in the lower part of the zone, and he gets sharper break when he buries it, and uses it as a put away offering. He moves his fastball all around to all quadrants of the zone, and is a plus pitch because of how well he commands the pitch. He was left off the Oregon State roster for the 2020 season, leading some to wonder where his health actually is right now. As a redshirt sophomore, Abel has some leverage and can return to school in 2021.
Photo credit: GazetteTimes
78. Isaiah Greene – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 180 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Corona (CA)
Another high-end athlete from the prep ranks, Greene has arguably one of the higher ceilings in this class from a prep bat standpoint. He’s an easy 70-grade runner, with natural strides that allow him to cover plenty of ground in center field, and makes him a menace on the basepaths. Greene’s approach at the plate is more contact-oriented, and he steadily sprays line drives into the gaps with not much pop to his game, because his bat stays level through the zone without much elevation. Greene performed well against high level competition last summer and was off to a hot start prior to the national lockdown being put in place. It’s likely that he gets drafted this year as teams will see an opportunity to take on a truly special athlete with the natural tools to take that next step.
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79. David Calabrese – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 17 yr, Weight: 160 lbs, Height: 5-11
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: St. Elizabeth (ON)
While often the top Canadian prep player is an arm. This is the second year it’s been an outfielder. Calabrese has a similar profile as last year’s top Canadian prep, Dasan Brown, though he’s much more polished in what he does.

Calabrese is very young for his class, not turning 18 until late September.
But his current 5’10”, 160-170 pound frame does not offer much power, even if he does show tremendous bat control from the left side. Teams that believe in his ability to add power see a guy who could control the strike zone, and contribute on the bases and defensively while offering enough power at the plate to keep pitchers honest.

A Phillies scout referenced two former Phillies outfielders when asked what Calabrese’s future may look like, in mentioning Shane VictorinoLenny Dykstra’s Philadelphia time. Fantasy owners and any MLB club would be overjoyed if he developed into that.
Photo credit: MLB
80. Colt Keith – 3B/RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 220 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Biloxi (MS)
An Arizona State commit with a record on the showcase circuit as a two way prospect. Keith is likely to end up an infielder long term, whether that at his native shortstop or a potential move to third base remains to be seen. One thing that stands out about Keith defensively, is his strong throwing arm, showing good zip and accuracy on his throws to first. At the plate, Keith’s setup is somewhat raw. He shows tons of bat speed in his left handed stroke, but he lacks stability in his lower half, and his hips fire a little early. It leads to an upper body dependent swing with a heavily rotational finish. He does show feel for the barrel, and will fire line drives all over the field in batting practice. How much power Keith possesses, will depend on adding loft and generating greater strength from his lower half. Another prep talent that might entice a team to meet his number in the second round.
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81. Chase Davis – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 211 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Franklin (CA)
I don’t always do comps, but it’s easy to see a bit of a poor mans (and left-handed) Jo Adell (when he was coming out) in Davis. Davis has some timing issues with his swing, and there will be some swing and miss early. But boy the tools are loud. A natural fit for right field, there will be plenty of teams tempted to keep Davis from getting to campus at Arizona.

At the plate Davis has a strong, whip-like swing, that has some natural launch and can create big power when he’s on time. He has a notable bat wrap, and a leg lift that can add timing issues to an already longer swing. As such, he isn’t always on time and can be susceptible to spin. But he hit incredibly well this summer (both for power and average) and the bat speed is undeniable. Davis may have to make some alterations to avoid high K rates against advanced pitching, but he should grow into plus game power at maturity given his bat speed and strong/athletic frame.

A weight room warrior, Davis has a big, chiseled frame, but moves well underway. Already 6’1 210, he is an above average runner underway, but takes a bit to get going and will likely settle in as an average runner at maturity. As such, CF is unlikely, but luckily his best tool is an absolute bazooka of an arm that plays very well in right field. Davis is already flirting with triple digit velocities from the outfield, and has great carry to his throws. It’s a legit double plus tool and one of (if not the) best outfield arms in the entire class.

Overall, while Davis’s swing has some risk, he’s one of the most explosive players in the class. He has two double plus tools in his arm and bat speed, and his work ethic draws rave reviews. When you factor in that he was one of the top performers both at the national showcase in Phoenix, and the WWBA in Jupiter, scouts have seen him at his best in the two biggest scouting hot beds in the nation. He should have plenty of suitors this June.
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82. Seth Lonsway – LHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 200 lbs, Height: 6-3
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Ohio State
Lonsway’s a tall, well-built lefty with an over-the-top arm slot. That gives him good life on his mid-90s fastball, which plays well at the top of the zone. The vertical arm action creates 12-6 shape on his curveball, but he doesn’t often do a good job of staying on top and driving it down in. He also has a slider with some tilt and a straight changeup; each of those flashes average. Not a great athlete, he has some strike-throwing issues, with a tendency for the fastball to sail up and arm-side. Realistically, he projects as a reliever, but the fastball life could make it an imposing pitch if he adds a bit more velocity in shorter stints.
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83. Hayden Cantrelle – SS
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 175 lbs, Height: 5-11
Hits/Throws: S/R
School: Louisiana-Lafayette
A switch hitting speedster who likes to swing early and often.

Cantrelle has a leadoff profile with an aggressive approach at the plate. He’ll swing a lot and he’ll miss a lot, but the most interesting part is that he walks quite a bit too. In 135 games at Louisiana-Lafayette he struck out 122 times and walked 90. At the plate he has quick hands.
In looks that the Prospects Live staff got, it was noted that his power shows through more from the left side of the dish and that he will profile better defensively as a second baseman. He’s for sure a plus runner with the instincts to match on the basepaths.

A slow start in 2020 saw his average will below the Mendoza line won’t do much for his stock, but there are some tools there for a team to get a guy that could sit atop their lineup.
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84. Nick Garcia – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 215 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Chapman
Nick Garcia one of the top prospects out of the lowly covered D3. Garcia made his name after an appearance on the Cape over the summer. However, an even stronger spring helped Garcia become one of the highest risers in the class. Garcia started the spring throwing upper 90s, tagging 98 about 3-4 mph faster than 2019. He pairs it with a slider and a cutter that was key for him to have double-digit K/9s for both 2019 and 2020 before the shutdown. Garcia doesn’t have much of a track record against top talent as well as accuracy problems. However, Garcia is a raw talent that has potential to be turned into more than a flamethrower. Definitely a name to watch.Knack, a fifth year senior from East Tennessee State, is one of the riskier options in this class but comes with a healthy serving of upside. A two way star at Walters St JC, Knack has always thrown strikes and put up quality numbers. However, 2020 was when he truly broke out both from a numeric standpoint and from a pure stuff standpoint.
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85. Landon Knack – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 22 yr, Weight: 220 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: East Tennessee State
Knack, a fifth year senior from East Tennessee State, is one of the riskier options in this class but comes with a healthy serving of upside. A two way star at Walters St JC, Knack has always thrown strikes and put up quality numbers. However, 2020 was when he truly broke out both from a numeric standpoint and from a pure stuff standpoint.

In his four 2020 starts, Knack went 4-0 with a 1.08 ERA, 0.52 WHIP, and a 51/1 K/BB ratio across 25 IP. While these numbers were a clear jump from 2019, he did go 9-4 with a 2.60 ERA and 94/16 K/BB in 2019 across 97 IP, so it’s not like he was a bum before. Where Knack really put his name on the map this year was with his stuff. Knack had previously sat 89-92 with no notable secondaries. In this shortened season, he was sitting 93-95 comfortably and even reaching 98 with his fastball. He also flashed above average with his slider and threw an average curve and change. All of sudden, Knack (who has always thrown with plus command) had a genuine starters pitch mix.

That being said, he only showed this arsenal for a four game stretch due to the shortened season. There will still be concerns for if he can keep this up for a full season, let alone a career. Even if the newfound stuff holds up, Knack isn’t without concerns. Knack has a thick 6’2 225 body that looks to be maxed out. His thick lower half should hold up well, but he will have to keep an eye on conditioning. He doesn’t have the prettiest delivery in the world, with his delivery featuring some effort and a longer arm action in the back. That being said, he has a nice little side-step delivery from the stretch and really shortens things up. Not only does this make him hard to run on (given his velocity) but gives hitters a very different look to adjust to from his normal delivery. Knack also has a notable injury history, injuring his throwing shoulder in 2015 and his non-throwing shoulder in 2017.

Overall, Knack has a repertoire that reminds me a good amount of Mariners 2019 first round pick George Kirby with a similar ability to throw for strikes (albeit with a very different body and mechanics). If Knack’s stuff remains, he has a high floor as a quick-moving power reliever with a high ceiling as a potential mid-rotation starter who should move quickly as well. If not, he won’t likely be worth his draft slot, but still has value as a low 90’s arm that throws strikes. Knack is one of my favorite sleeper arms in the class and will likely be very signable as a fifth year senior.
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86. Sam Weatherly – LHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 205 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Clemson
A former state of Michigan player of the year, and now with 3 years of college ball under his belt. Sam Weatherly was a high riser this spring, thanks to a vintage 2017 start to the year. Breaking out with a 0.79 ERA in four starts for Clemson. His 6-4, 210 lb frame suggests a bit more room to grow with a chance to add more velocity to his 91-93 mph fastball. Weatherly uses it as a way to throw past batters that are suspecting his best pitch, a plus wipeout slider. The slider is easily a plus pitch, and good enough to make teams interested as it was major in striking out plenty this spring, 43 total in just 22.2 IP. Weatherly also throws a changeup with a legit chance to become a solid third dealing. Although, Weatherly may get tons of strikeouts, Weatherly struggles with control, as he had walked 14 batters in this spring and walked 30 in 2019 in 29.1 IP. Which brings up another question mark, the lack of innings and track record. Weatherly, throughout his 3 years only pitched 72.1 innings, having only started games in 2020. Although a major hike in strikeouts, and a sudden emergence to the Friday night role for 2020, may give enough proof to a front office that there might be more to come.
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87. Enrique Bradfield – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 155 lbs, Height: 6-0
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: American Heritage (FL)
Enrique Bradfield is one of the more exciting players in the class to watch, the owner of true 80 grade speed. Bradfield is in the mold of a throwback leadoff hitter, using his speed to get on base and take some extra bases while patrolling center field defensively. There isn’t a ton of power in his game, but he did at least show signs of having some back in the MLB PDP League last summer. If a team drafts him, it will be doing so with the belief that the pop we saw in the PDP League is a sign there is something more in the tank, as that team would need to sign him away from Vanderbilt.
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88. Jake Vogel – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 165 lbs, Height: 5-11
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Huntington Beach (CA)
The Huntington Beach prep product is an interesting test case in this condensed draft. Vogel is an undersized righty bat with 80-grade speed, and a cannon arm from centerfield. It’s an overall plus defensive package in center, and that combined with a potentially interesting bat make him a name to be aware of. His swing is a unique one, but it’s one that we’ve grown to like as we’ve dug into the player. It’s simple, quiet, and direct to the ball, but features a massive uppercut and it allows him to elevate the ball naturally. His bat to ball, and feel for the barrel are strong, and with some added strength and additional coaching, he could develop average (or even slightly above) pop. He supposedly has a strong commitment to UCLA, and it will be interesting to see if a team pays up for the skills here. We’d bet he ends up on campus, but this draft is a unique beast.
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89. Ian Seymour – LHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 210 lbs, Height: 6-0
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Virginia Tech
Seymour likely wouldn’t have been in this conversation, had it not been for some impressive velocity gains over the off-season. He was sitting in the high-80s last summer in the Cape Cod league, and came out of the gate sitting between 90-92 mph, touching 94 mph with heavy action. He essentially throws bowling balls into the zone with a deceptive delivery that makes it difficult for hitters to square him up. Seymour’s best secondary pitch is a tumbling changeup that is thrown with fastball arm speed, and grades out as a swing-and-miss pitch. His third offering is a slider that doesn’t have much vertical break to it, and is a fringe average offering, if that. Seymour isn’t the biggest guy, standing at 6-feet tall and doesn’t have much projection to him, but his pitchability and increased velocity will likely lead to him drafting.
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90. Anthony Servideo – SS
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 175 lbs, Height: 5-10
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Mississippi
In a draft without an elite college shortstop, Servideo represents one of a deep group of college shortstops that should begin to impact draft boards around pick #20, and continue to be in play throughout the next two rounds.

Servideo’s standout tool over many of the others is his raw speed. His first step is as quick as any in the draft, and he has tremendous body control to stop his body at full tilt chasing a ball to redirect his energy on a throw toward first with an extremely accurate arm, that allows it to play up from its average to above-average raw strength.

With the stick in hand, Servideo offers raw power to blend with his speed and showed plenty of plate discipline. The defense is the calling card here, but the strong offensive spring he showed for Ole Miss should bring Servideo into play as soon as the middle of the second round.
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91. Jack Leftwich – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 210 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Florida
After a standout Freshman season in 2018, that saw Leftwich among the top rookie performers not only in the SEC, but all of college baseball. An inability to keep the ball in the ballpark his sophomore season, led to a difficult 2019, where Leftwich posted a gnarly 5+ ERA. The struggles to minimize contact, were likely rooted in a drop in velocity that saw the right-hander’s heater drop a few ticks. Leftwich blamed a blister issue for some of his velocity dips, and his Cape Cod League performance last summer supports this. He was back up to 91-94 flashing a slurvy slider to keep hitters off balance. He generates excellent backspin on his fastball, with a reported 12:37 tilt per Driveline/D1. There’s some concerns about his spin efficiency, but it’s something the right organization can improve. While his fastball is projectable, his slider is already a plus offering. He shows excellent numbers in the way of horizontal sweep and vertical drop. What’s unique about Leftwich is his ability to generate this movement on the pitch despite well below average spin (under-2100 rpm average). This is a testament to spin efficiency, where Leftwich’s slider would rank in the top 10% of MLB in spin efficiency per Driveline/D1. An intriguing player for an analytically minded organization in the late second to mid-third round.
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92. Alerick Soularie – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 175 lbs, Height: 6-0
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Tennessee
Soularie has above-average raw power, and mashed as Tennessee’s left fielder in 2019, putting up a .357/.466/.602 line. He moved to center field in the brief 2020 season, but he’s likely to end up back in left in pro ball. Soularie had a rough look in a limited stretch on the Cape, getting too swing-happy and struggling mightily to diagnose offspeed stuff, but his plate discipline was better over the full season prior in Knoxville. The poor summer ball showing diminishes his stock a bit, but it’s important not to overemphasize a bad stretch of 29 plate appearances.
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93. Owen Caissie – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 17 yr, Weight: 190 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Notre Dame (ON)
One of the more intriguing guys outside of the Top 50 has to be Canadian prep outfielder Owen Caissie. The cold weather, Canadian background, the projectable 6’4″, 190 pound frame, and the fact he doesn’t even turn 18 years old until July, suggest that there is plenty more to come for the lefty hitter. Caissie had a strong showing with the Canadian Junior National Team this spring, though did so in the corner instead of center, because of the presence of fellow prospect David Calabrese. Caissie has a pair of plus tools in his raw power and his arm, with above average athleticism and a chance to be an average or better defender, depending on where he ends up. A team may want to try him in center, as he has the athleticism to make it worth trying, though he has the arm to be an even better defender in right. The biggest question with Caissie is how much power he can tap into in game, as his swing isn’t the best for tapping into that plus raw power. The good news is that he has proven to be a coachable prospect, and some believe that he can make the needed adjustments. Really Caissie takes a lot of projection, but if a team believes in him it is likely to try to sign him away from Michigan.
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94. Burl Carraway – LHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 173 lbs, Height: 6-0
Hits/Throws: L/L
School: Dallas Baptist
A college reliever with big stuff that will certainly play in a pro bullpen.

Everything about Carraway’s movements on the mound are quick. His arm is like a slingshot and he uses his lower half well to create velocity. His fastball gets up to 97 mph and curveball is a great offering too. In terms of pure stuff, it’s been said on more than one occasion, that he could be plugged into a big league bullpen right now.

Unfortunately for Carraway, pure stuff isn’t the only measure that counts. His command needs improvement. He’s walked 31 batters in 51 innings of work in college, including 6 walks in 9 innings before the 2020 season came to a close.

The walk numbers will have to come down, but Carraway has electric stuff that could lead to a bright future anchoring a bullpen.
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95. Carson Tucker – SS
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 170 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Mountain Pointe (AZ)
While Carson Tucker may not have the outgoing personality, or luscious locks to match his brother Cole’s, his game carries a lot of similarities to the 2014 first round pick. The Arizona prep shortstop has seen his stock rise quite a bit this spring, thanks both to his growth spurt and to his personal development. While he was just under six feet as a junior, Tucker now comes in at about 6-foot-2, and has gotten notably stronger and faster as well. While he lacks standout tools, Tucker is a very smooth baseball player, and has mostly solid tools across the board. At the plate he shows solid bat speed and control for the barrel, and consistently makes hard contact, albeit without much home run power. He reworked his swing a bit this spring and saw positive results, but he still has just gap power, without much raw power. He may be able to add more home run power as he gets stronger, but that remains to be seen. Defensively, Tucker seems to have all the tools to be an everyday shortstop. He’s quick on his feet, has fast hands, and a strong, accurate arm as well. While he was seen as an average runner in the past, Tucker has been reported to post some plus run times in the spring, as he’s gotten a decent bit quicker. While Carson likely won’t sneak into the first round like his brother, he has a very good chance to be selected starting in the second round.
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96. Markevian Hence – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 17 yr, Weight: 175 lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Watson Chapel (AR)
Hailing from Pine Bluff, Arkansas; Markevian Hence’s lack of exposure to national competition makes him a bit hard to judge. In the few events he took part in, however, he was very impressive, notably turning heads with his incredible arm speed. Hence isn’t physically imposing at all, coming in at 6-foot-1, 175 pounds. Despite that, Hence has an electric fastball, which usually sits 93-95, touching as high as 97, and has heavy sinking action. He compliments that with a slider that flashes plus, and which he’s shown great feel for. It usually sits in the high 70s, but with his arm speed, we’d imagine he’ll throw it a bit harder as a pro. He’s also shown some feel for a changeup, which is in its early stages of development, but plays up thanks to the sink of his fastball. While he’s very raw, he’s shown the ability to throw all three of his pitches for strikes, which is usually the concern for pitchers at the same stage of development as him. All of this is especially impressive when you consider that Hence is one of the youngest players in the entire draft, as he doesn’t turn 18 until August. With his wiry frame and incredible arm speed, Hence reminds us a bit of Yordano Ventura, and could be a huge steal wherever he ends up, especially if it’s to a team that excels in pitching development.
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97. Trei Cruz – SS
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 200 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: S/R
School: Rice
Cruz, a switch-hitting shortstop from Rice, showed some of the best tools on the Cape last summer. He’s got plus bat speed from both sides of the plate and the athleticism to play somewhere on the infield, although he’s not going to stick at shortstop. Cruz is a patient hitter, but he doesn’t use his lower half well in his swing, and the barrel doesn’t stay in the hitting zone all that long, leading to whiffs and mishits. He’s a power-over-hit utility type.
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98. Tyler Keenan – 3B
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 240 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Mississippi
Keenan was on his way to a monster season in 2020. Before the shutdown he had slugged seven homers in 17 games, and was building on a strong 2019 when he led the Ole Miss squad in homers. His swing features a huge load that adds considerable length, but the bat speed is plus which was enough to square up collegiate arms. We don’t think it will work in pro ball without some adjustments, but the plus raw power and natural bat speed are worth gambling on. He uses all fields and is capable of leaving the yard to left despite being a left-handed hitter. He will take a walk, but there will be swing and miss concerns in pro ball if he doesn’t find a way to become more direct to the ball. Defensively Keenan is a first baseman in pro ball despite playing third for Ole Miss. He’s not a strong athlete and has limited lateral range.
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99. Yohandy Morales – 3B
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 18 yr, Weight: 195 lbs, Height: 6-4
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Braddock (FL)
Big, toolsy, and strong. Morales is the type of guy who scouts dream over when they’re young, and when he was younger, he did crush baseballs, but he’s simply not added the polish in his game that many would have liked to see at this point. Morales is still really a “tweener” physically as well, with the frame to fill into a hulking, 6’4″ corner-only guy, but with the speed and present size that could lead a team to believe that he could still work up the middle, even at his height.

A team that sat on Morales early this year, likely has a better opinion on him. As he did get good marks early this year for potentially taking that long-awaited step at the plate to show more polish and discipline on when to unleash his raw plus power. A team that believes in his athleticism, plus arm, and early showing in 2020, could pop Morales in the second round, otherwise, he very well may end up on campus in Miami in the fall, and has the type of body/skill combination that is likely to be very attractive coming out of college in a few years.
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100. Tyler Gentry – OF
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 21 yr, Weight: 210 lbs, Height: 6-2
Hits/Throws: R/R
School: Alabama
One of the strongest swings in the draft, Gentry generates easy 60/65 raw power from the right side with a powerful swing, and he’s not a power-only player with enough athleticism to be a contributor defensively and on the bases as well.

Gentry will have concerns due to recognizing break and resulting high strikeout rates due to issues with that lack of break recognition. But a team willing to work with him could benefit with one of the few guys in this draft capable of someday hitting 40 major league home runs in a season.
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101. Zach McCambley – RHP
Draft Top-100
Bio:
Age: 20 yr, Weight: 215 lbs lbs, Height: 6-1
Hits/Throws: L/R
School: Coastal Carolina
A favorite of our team this summer down the Cape, ranking 17th on our CCBL Top 50. McCambley is a shining example of the depth in the college pitching class. A talent that likely lands in the day one picks in 2019, finds himself in a deep group of arms all vying for day one consideration. Zach didn’t enjoy great success at Coastal his first two years, but after a breakout during his stint in Cotuit, the results continued into the early part of the canceled season. Armed with a three-pitch arsenal the curveball is the jewel of his arsenal flashing arguably 60+ with above average spin. The four seam sits anywhere from 90-95 while bumping a couple of 6’s, with above average raw spin numbers. His changeup is a fringe average pitch, and a likely focus for any team that selects him. A starter’s body and profile, McCambley should be developed as a rotation arm no matter where he lands.
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